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OVERACTIVEBLADDERTEST.CA

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Tips to Manage Overactive Bladder (OAB) During COVID-19

​ Are you living with Overactive Bladder?

As the COVID-19 situation evolves, many Canadians are adapting to a new normal. Because self-isolation may be impacting your OAB, we’ve gathered four behavioural tips that may help you manage your OAB while at home.

Tips to Manage Overactive Bladder (OAB) During COVID-19

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Tip 1: Manage your fluids!

The amount of liquid you drink can affect how often you need to visit the bathroom. Drinking too much can make you go more often, which increases your risk of having an “accident”. But drinking too little isn’t good either—if you don’t stay hydrated, your kidneys may not work as well. Avoid drinking large amounts in a short period of time, but rather drink smaller amounts spread out during the day. Try to limit the amount of liquid you drink 2—4 hours before bedtime to help reduce the number of times you need to visit the bathroom at night.

Tip 1: Manage your fluids!

The amount of liquid you drink can affect how often you need to visit the bathroom. Drinking too much can make you go more often, which increases your risk of having an “accident”. But drinking too little isn’t good either—if you don’t stay hydrated, your kidneys may not work as well. Avoid drinking large amounts in a short period of time, but rather drink smaller amounts spread out during the day. Try to limit the amount of liquid you drink 2—4 hours before bedtime to help reduce the number of times you need to visit the bathroom at night.

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Tip 2: Dietary modifications can help.

Limiting the amount of caffeinated and alcoholic beverages you consume, as well as artificial sweeteners, such as aspartame, may improve your OAB symptoms. Otherwise, these ingredients can irritate the bladder and/or increase urine production.

Tip 2: Dietary modifications can help.

Limiting the amount of caffeinated and alcoholic beverages you consume, as well as artificial sweeteners, such as aspartame, may improve your OAB symptoms. Otherwise, these ingredients can irritate the bladder and/or increase urine production.

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Tip 3: Consider retraining your bladder.

There are two basic strategies involved in bladder retraining:

1. Keeping a regular bathroom schedule, gradually increasing the time between visits.

2. Learning to suppress the urge to urinate by doing strong pelvic muscle contractions and distracting yourself with something else, like counting backwards to delay urination.

Tip 3: Consider retraining your bladder.

There are two basic strategies involved in bladder retraining:

1. Keeping a regular bathroom schedule, gradually increasing the time between visits.

2. Learning to suppress the urge to urinate by doing strong pelvic muscle contractions and distracting yourself with something else, like counting backwards to delay urination.

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Tip 4: Practice Kegel exercises.

Developed by Dr. Arnold Kegel, these exercises are designed to strengthen the muscles of the pelvic floor so that the bladder is kept in place and the urethra stays shut tight.

First start doing them while lying down, then progress to doing them sitting and standing as your muscles get stronger. With your knees slightly apart, relax and find your pelvic muscles. Imagine that you are trying to hold back urine or a bowel movement. Squeeze the muscles you would use to do that. Do not do these exercises while voiding or having a bowel movement!

  • Tighten the muscles for 5 to 10 seconds. Make sure you keep breathing normally.
  • Now relax the muscles for about 10 seconds.
  • Repeat 12-20 times, three to five times a day.

Tip 4: Practice Kegel exercises.

Developed by Dr. Arnold Kegel, these exercises are designed to strengthen the muscles of the pelvic floor so that the bladder is kept in place and the urethra stays shut tight.

First start doing them while lying down, then progress to doing them sitting and standing as your muscles get stronger. With your knees slightly apart, relax and find your pelvic muscles. Imagine that you are trying to hold back urine or a bowel movement. Squeeze the muscles you would use to do that. Do not do these exercises while voiding or having a bowel movement!

  • Tighten the muscles for 5 to 10 seconds. Make sure you keep breathing normally.
  • Now relax the muscles for about 10 seconds.
  • Repeat 12-20 times, three to five times a day.

still have questions?

still have questions?

Be sure to discuss any treatments with your healthcare professional. If you are still searching for answers learn more about OAB from one of Canada’s leading experts below.

Canadian Continence Foundation

CCF is the national Canadian charity addressing the needs of those living with urinary and bowel incontinence. ​

The Canadian Continence Foundation

TCCF was formed to address the needs of consumers experiencing the different types of urinary and bowel incontinence. ​

Functional & Reconstructive Urology Society of Canada

FRUSC was started in 2018 by a group of physicians with special interest in the field of adult urinary tract disorders.

Functional & Reconstructive Urology Society of Canada

FRUSC was started in 2018 by a group of physicians with special interest in the field of adult urinary tract disorders.

Urology Nurses of Canada

UNC is a national not-for-profit association whose mandate is to enhance the specialty of urologic nursing in Canada by promoting education, leadership, research, and clinical practice.

Urology Nurses of Canada

UNC is a national not-for-profit association whose mandate is to enhance the specialty of urologic nursing in Canada by promoting education, leadership, research, and clinical practice.

Canadian Urological Association

The CUA exists to promote the highest standard of urologic care for Canadians and to advance the science of urology.

Canadian Urological Association

The CUA exists to promote the highest standard of urologic care for Canadians and to advance the science of urology.

​ Health information contained herein is provided for general educational purposes only. Your healthcare professional is the single best source of information regarding your health. Please consult your healthcare professional if you have any questions about your health or treatment.

​ Copyright © 2020. A Canadian research-based pharmaceutical company. All rights reserved.

​ Copyright © 2019. A Canadian research-based pharmaceutical company. All rights reserved.